What Really Caused Polio?

What caused polio?

What causes polio.

Polio is caused by the poliovirus.

The virus enters the body through the mouth.

It is spread through contact with the feces (stool) of an infected person or through exposure to phlegm or mucus when an infected person coughs or sneezes..

How did Polio go away?

The disease has been virtually wiped out in the Western hemisphere since the introduction of the inactivated polio vaccine (the “Salk vaccine”) in 1955 and the oral, live vaccine (the “Sabin vaccine”) in 1961.

When was polio at its worst?

At its peak in the 1940s and 1950s, polio would paralyze or kill over half a million people worldwide every year.

Why did polio spread so easily?

The polio virus usually enters the environment in the feces of someone who is infected. In areas with poor sanitation, the virus easily spreads from feces into the water supply, or, by touch, into food. In addition, because polio is so contagious, direct contact with a person infected with the virus can cause polio.

What countries still have polio 2020?

Four regions of the world are certified polio free—the Americas, Europe, South East Asia and the Western Pacific. Only three polio-endemic countries (countries that have never interrupted the transmission of wild poliovirus) remain—Afghanistan, Nigeria, and Pakistan.

When did they stop vaccinating for polio?

OPV was recommended for use in the United States for almost 40 years, from 1963 until 2000. The results have been miraculous: Polio was eliminated from the United States in 1979 and from the Western Hemisphere in 1991. Since 2000, only IPV is recommended to prevent polio in the United States.

Can a baby be born with polio?

During pregnancy there is an increased susceptibility to poliomyelitis. In spite of this the incidence of polio virus infections causing disease in the fetus or in the new- born child is small [l]. A number of cases reported, however, have been strongly sug- gestive of an intra-uterine infection with polio virus.

Can you still get polio?

Polio does still exist, although polio cases have decreased by over 99% since 1988, from an estimated more than 350 000 cases to 22 reported cases in 2017. This reduction is the result of the global effort to eradicate the disease.

Does polio reduce life expectancy?

In less than 1% of cases, polio causes permanent paralysis of the arms, legs or breathing muscles. Between 5 and 10% of people who develop paralytic polio will die. Physical symptoms may return 15 years or more after the first polio infection.

What was the mortality rate of polio?

The mortality rate for acute paralytic polio ranges from 5–15%. The paralysis can progress for up to one week. Permanent weakness is observed in two-thirds of patients with paralytic poliomyelitis.

What was the mortality rate of polio before vaccine?

During 1951-1954, an average of 16,316 paralytic polio cases and 1879 deaths from polio were reported each year (9,10). Polio incidence declined sharply following the introduction of vaccine to less than 1000 cases in 1962 and remained below 100 cases after that year.

What really cured polio?

Before a vaccine was available, polio caused more than 15,000 cases of paralysis a year in the U.S. It was the most feared disease of the 20th century. With the success of the polio vaccine, Jonas Salk, 39, became one of the most celebrated scientists in the world.

How long do polio survivors live?

For years, most polio survivors lived active lives, their memory of polio mainly forgotten, their health status stable. But by the late 1970s, survivors who were 20 or more years past their original diagnosis began noting new problems, including fatigue, pain, breathing or swallowing problems, and additional weakness.

What is the key symptom of polio?

Paralysis is the most severe symptom associated with polio, because it can lead to permanent disability and death. Between 2 and 10 out of 100 people who have paralysis from poliovirus infection die, because the virus affects the muscles that help them breathe.

Who made polio virus?

In the early 1950s, 25,000 to 50,000 new cases of polio occurred each year. Jonas Salk (1914–1995) became a national hero when he allayed the fear of the dreaded disease with his polio vaccine, approved in 1955.

Is polio a man made disease?

No, says Wimmer. “Polio is a very simple virus,” he tells WebMD. “The smallpox virus is much, much larger, and to put it together from scratch right now is almost impossible. Smallpox could not be re-created now, but maybe in 20-30 years when technology is more advanced.

Can polio be passed down genetically?

No. Post polio syndrome is not inherited .

Can you catch polio from swimming?

We now know that polio is spread through a fecal-oral contact route, and almost always through contaminated water.

How is polio transmitted from one person to another?

Polio is spread when the stool of an infected person is introduced into the mouth of another person through contaminated water or food (fecal-oral transmission). Oral-oral transmission by way of an infected person’s saliva may account for some cases.

How do you kill the polio virus so it is not harmful?

Use formaldehyde to kill the viruses. There are several ways to inactivate a virus or bacteria for use in a vaccine. One way is to expose the pathogen to heat. This is how the bacteria in the typhoid vaccine is inactivated.