Which Organ Is Responsible For Balance?

What controls balance and equilibrium?

The vestibular system is the sensory apparatus of the inner ear that helps the body maintain its postural equilibrium.

The information furnished by the vestibular system is also essential for coordinating the position of the head and the movement of the eyes..

What factors affect balance?

Causes of balance problems include:infections of your ear.inner ear problems.head injury.poor blood circulation.certain medications.chemical imbalance in your brain.low blood pressure.high blood pressure.More items…

What are the symptoms of inner ear problems?

Symptoms of inner ear infections include:Dizziness.Spinning sensation.Nausea.Vomiting.Problems with balance or walking.Hearing loss.Earache or ear pain.Ringing in the ear (tinnitus)

Why am I losing my balance as I age?

Long-term medical condition that affects the nervous system can have an impact on balance, too. Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and Multiple Sclerosis are just a few. In addition, arthritis, heart problems, and certain medications seniors take for chronic illnesses can all contribute to unsteadiness.

How does your inner ear affect your balance?

Loop-shaped canals in your inner ear contain fluid and fine, hairlike sensors that help you keep your balance. At the base of the canals are the utricle and saccule, each containing a patch of sensory hair cells.

What medications can cause loss of balance?

Medications Can Cause Balance ProblemsAntidepressants.Anti-seizure drugs (anticonvulsants)Hypertensive (high blood pressure) drugs.Sedatives.Tranquilizers.Anxiolytics (anti-anxiety drugs)Antihistamines prescribed to relieve allergy symptoms.Aminoglycosides (a type of antibiotic)More items…

Does Vision affect balance?

While vision may not appear to be the most important factor in keeping balance, the body needs them to maintain it normally. It takes the vestibular, vision, and proprioceptive systems working together to keep things level; but it is the vision which provides most of the necessary information.

Does sleep affect balance?

Acute sleep deprivation is known to affect human balance and posture control. However, the effects of variations in sleep quality and pattern over consecutive days have received less attention.

What can make you unsteady on your feet?

Loss of balance or unsteadinessVestibular problems. Abnormalities in your inner ear can cause a sensation of a floating or heavy head and unsteadiness in the dark.Nerve damage to your legs (peripheral neuropathy). … Joint, muscle or vision problems. … Medications. … Certain neurological conditions.

What are the factors affecting stability?

Common factors that affect this stability include temperature, light, pH, oxidation and enzymatic degradation. Special considerations are also required when dealing with chiral molecules, deuterated internal standards and large biomolecules.

What stimulates balance?

Whenever you tilt your head, gravity causes the crystals to slide to one side, creating a pull on the gel and the sensory hairs. This triggers your hair cells to fire nerve impulses along your vestibular nerve to your brain. Your second organ of balance detects rotational movements of your head.

How can I improve my inner ear balance?

Semont ManeuverSit on the edge of your bed. Turn your head 45 degrees to the right.Quickly lie down on your left side. Stay there for 30 seconds.Quickly move to lie down on the opposite end of your bed. … Return slowly to sitting and wait a few minutes.Reverse these moves for the right ear.

How do you treat equilibrium problems?

Your treatment may include:Balance retraining exercises (vestibular rehabilitation). Therapists trained in balance problems design a customized program of balance retraining and exercises. … Positioning procedures. … Diet and lifestyle changes. … Medications. … Surgery.

Which balance is required by the body when it is moving?

Answer. There are two types of balance: static and dynamic. Static balance is maintaining equilibrium when stationary, while dynamic balance is maintaining equilibrium when moving. We use our eyes, ears and ‘body sense’ to help retain our balance.